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Glass Transition Temperature | Tg

What is a Glass Transition Temperature? | What is Tg?

The glass transition temperature (Tg) is somewhat of a misnomer, as it is actually a range of a few degrees Celsius over which a polymeric material transitions from a glassy (rigid) to elastomeric (rubbery) state. The Tg is typically reported as the median of that range of temperatures. The Tg can be measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermo mechanical analysis (TMA), or dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA).

The Tg of a material helps to define its mechanical properties. Silicones, for example, all have a Tg around -100°C. For typical operating temperatures (-40 to +200°C), the silicone will always appear soft and flexible, because it is always operating above its Tg.

Other chemistries have variable Tg. Often, the Tg of these materials is determined by the temperature at which the material is cured. The higher the cure temperature, the higher the Tg. For applications that require consistent mechanical properties over the entire operating temperature range, having a Tg outside that the operating temperature range is imperative.

Featured Products

Adhesives

Our range of structural adhesives utilizes acrylic, epoxy and urethane chemistries - providing various options in terms of cure temperatures, operating temperature ranges, mechanical properties and Tg.

Electronic Materials

Our Electronic Materials product line includes solutions across a range of glass transition temperatures, allowing the desired mechanical properties and other characteristics to be maintained throughout various operating temperature ranges.

 



For applications that require consistent mechanical properties over the entire operating temperature range, having a Glass Transition Temperature, or Tg, outside that operating temperature range is imperative.

Application Note: Silicones often appear elastomeric, or "rubbery", because they typically operate well above their Tg. Most silicones would have to be subjected to extremely cold temperatures to become rigid or "glassy".

For applications that require consistent mechanical properties over the entire operating temperature range, having a Glass Transition Temperature, or Tg, outside that operating temperature range is imperative.

Application Note: Other materials, such as epoxies or urethanes, can maintain rigid mechanical properties if their Tg is high enough to be outside the application's operating temperature range.

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